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FLOAT TUBE FISHING FORUM » Non-Fishing Related Discussions » Fishermen helping fishermen » Details for the new tuber

Details for the new tuber

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1Details for the new tuber Empty Details for the new tuber on Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:50 pm

jeffcpr

jeffcpr
Admin
Hi everyone I am looking to put together for the forum and new members a list of tips for those that are new to Float Tube Fishing.

What is your advice, and what mistakes did you make. I think this would be a good idea to compile this for those members that are still looking for advice. We can also point new members coming in for info to better prepare them from there venture into this sport.

New members and seasoned members we all have something to add that are important to someone. So please I don't care if you have been here all 9 years or only the last 2 months post up your experience. Let's share with others and help make there experience a good one.


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2Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:37 am

Alakai

Alakai
Team Poseidon
Team Poseidon
What kind of format are you looking for?

Like

Essentials: Float tube selection, waders, pole holders, etc...

or

Just a combination of thoughts and experience?

https://www.youtube.com/c/FisherNewb

3Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:42 am

jeffcpr

jeffcpr
Admin
I am thinking a beginners guide from the forum. So ya a list of combination of thoughts and experience. I assume essentials will be a big part of all this as well is we build it.


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4Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:50 am

Alakai

Alakai
Team Poseidon
Team Poseidon
Okay I will get something going and email it to you or something then. Suppose you can just copy and paste from there or will wait until the format is up and I can copy and paste it myself.

https://www.youtube.com/c/FisherNewb

5Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:37 am

jeffcpr

jeffcpr
Admin
So if we are looking for formate here are some areas to look and answer if you can.

Beginners Guide to Float Tube Fishing

1. What type of tube do you need?
2. Waders what should I get and why?
3. Fins which are best?
4. PFD what should I be looking for and do I really need it?
5. Additional items I should be thinking about.
6. What mistakes I have made in the past?
7. Any extra advice to help the newbie.


_________________
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6Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Mon Jan 07, 2019 1:32 pm

kin


Team Poseidon
Team Poseidon
1) any tube works, it's a question of how comfortable you'd like to be and how serious you are going to be. Basic donut/innertube style floattubes are still around and are VERY affordable aka "O" shaped. However, fishermen are approaching a new era of tubing because there are a lot of varieties out there now than before. You have your pontoon style tubes (two chambers forming a "H") as well as your "V" shape and "U" shape tubes. Most of the tubes we see on the water will be V or U shaped tubes.

O shaped tubes require you to sit in the water, sometimes up to your chest. They are, of course the cheapest. Full waders are ideal since so much of your body will be in water, last thing you want is to deal with cold from soaking in water all day. They move the slowest but you are very maneuverable due to the shape of the tube. They are also the hardest to get in and out of since you are sitting inside them. Storage is minimal with some pockets and custom rod racks is a must if you decide on bringing more than one rod. These tubes are single chambered, they pack up small.

U/V shaped tubes are faster. Some will offer you better a better seat so that you are more comfortable.  Most of these tubes will keep your knees out of the water, keeping you more dry and comfortable. There are more storage options as well, from the zippered storage areas on each chamber to the extra pocket behind the back rest. They track much better but are a little harder to turn/maneuver due to the larger size. There are cheap sub 100 dollar ones, but the most popular ones are between the 150-300 dollar range with the high end stuff being offered for more. A majority of these tubes will have two chambers, one on each side with the higher end ones being a combination of surfboard and tube. Due to the popularity of this style of tube, there is a lot of information on how to customize it to your liking with mounts and even trolling motors. The higher seating will make casting a little easier and the additional tray/net in front of the setting area assists with managing tackle or as a stripping apron (original intent). These tubes are not as compact as the O shaped ones and take up more space while deflated. One can easily fit a deflated U/V style tube in the trunk of a compact car. It's usually the foam seat/back rest that cause it to have a larger footprint.

H style tubes are a bit more diverse, there are float tubes shaped like this but mostly pontoons. They tout themselves as best for covering water since ideally, only the two chambers on either side of you will be in the water, causing a lot less resistance when moving. They are two chambered like the U/V styles as well. But they are not as popular. Unless you are going the route of a pontoon, expect to sit no higher than a U/V shaped tube and you will not have that extra storage space behind you where the tube chambers converge. They are a little lighter than U/V shaped tubes though. Cost wise, they are a little cheaper than the U/V shaped  so many people pay a little extra for the storage. Pontoons however, are a different beast. They are the largest of the tube family, with a metal frame allowing you to sit higher and out of the water if you chose to. They come with oars and some even attachments for anchors, swiveling seats, trolling motors etc. The storage capabilities can rival boats if you choose to customize one to that point. Given that they are predominately oar driven, they move a lot faster than U/V/H/O style floattubes. But keep in mind, they will take up more room and are harder to move from the vehicle to launch spot.  Cost wise, cheapest ones I've seen start around 300 and go up from there. You also have to take into consideration that since you are sitting so much higher, you act as a sail when the winds pick up so it is more difficult to hold positions during gusty days.

2) Waders: They are not necessarily needed to float tube, it's a question of comfort. If you are in warmer climates, you can sit in shorts all day. But in cooler climates and winter time, waders are ideal in order to keep your warm and comfortable. No body enjoys sitting in frigid waters in shorts for long periods of time. Then again, there are special folks out there that can tolerate such punishment, I am not one of them. It is suggested to get breathable waders since they offer a bit more leeway for fishing conditions. You can always layer up if it gets cold, or wear just shorts/tshirt underneath if it's warm. Neoprene is good for cooler climates, but when the sun comes out it gets hot and sticky. Pant waders are a good option too if you know how you sit in the tube already, but be warned that you may still get wet when you are kicking around.

3) Fins are one of the most important pieces of equipment you will have. They can make or break you while on the water. Its a good idea to be able to test out fins prior to committing to a pair. I would say avoid the hard, flat ones at all costs. They don't give you a good amount of thrust and can wear your down fast if you are new to the sport. I suggest getting a decent pair of dive fins, either step in or full foot. They can be had from 30 bucks on up. A basic fin you get from a sporting goods shop is a good starting point (think snorkling pack).  You want a fin that gives you the right amount of thrust to move you but not too long where it becomes difficult to turn.
Full foot is as described, it will fit like a shoe over your feet/stocking foot waders. Make sure they fit correctly too, they need to be snug but not overly tight. If you are going the route of stocking foot waders, add another size to your feet when you are deciding on fin size (if you wear a 9 shoe, you'll be looking for a fin that fits size 10...neoprene adds a size to your existing shoe size). Full foots are good since they are standard no frill fins. The huge draw back is you need to have a pair of footwear to wear between your vehicle and launch spot...last thing you want is to step on a pointy rock barefoot or wear a hole on the bottom of your stocking foot waders.
Step ins are very common as well. The ease of slipping them on like a slipper then securing them onto your foot by strap make it ideal since you don't need to worry about getting in/out of footwear. Draw back is you need to make sure you strap them in tight or else you risk them coming off while kicking.
I do admit, fins is where you will notice the most differences between styles and brands. Do try to check out user reviews if you cannot try them in person.

4) PFDs are a touchy subject.  Although some of us don't decide to not use one or take one while we are out there, it is up there for MUST haves. Better to have one and not need it, than need it and not have it. Keep in mind that we are sitting in the water and boats may not be able to see us. Any PFD is better than no PFD. A PFD being towed/stored on your tube is pretty much not having a PFD. Remeber, we are already partially in the water, won't take long for us to be fully submerged in the water.  Due to the limited amount of space we already have, many of us are using auto inflate vests. They are very comfortable and fit just like a vest allowing us full range of motion for casts and other tasks. When needed, they either auto inflate from water contact or are activated by cord. A co2 cartridge will inflate the vest to keep your head out of the water. Due to how we sit, I do not suggest a waist PFD, but having one is better than having none. Our safety is in our own hands, just like driving, just because we are good, doesnt mean everyone else is.
If anyone is curious, the USCG considers float tubes as vessels....

5) Extra stuff is always appreciated but not needed while tubing. Fish finders, anchors, rod holders etc is really up to you. Try to keep a patch kit handy if you puncture the tube and extra safety precautions such as lights and whistles. Something I do suggest is carrying water with you, dehydration happens faster than you realize when we are tubing. Always know what challenges your quarry will bring. If you are fishing areas with toothy/spikey fish, a lipgripper or landing net will give you some peace of mind. If you are fishing heavy structure/rocky/wooded areas have an extra handheld pump just in case you spring a leak due to a sharp rock/branch/shell etc.
You are on the water so have a hat and sunglasses. Even on overcast days, your eyes/head take a beating from UV rays.

6) Always be safe on the water if it is your first time out. Do not push your limits unless you know what are able to cope with. If you are fishing in current, pay attention to the tides as some areas will prove more than difficult to travel, most of us are using our legs as propulsion so fatigue sets in earlier than you think when fishing in current. Always be aware of your surroundings, as tempting as it may be to have headphones on and listening to music, obstacles such as boats/floating debris/etc can catch us unaware and can lead to disaster.

7) Everyone makes mistakes and some of us are too proud to admit how we took a dunking while trying to get off the tube...

Cool Never be afraid to reach out if you have more specific questions or things we haven't covered. We are a resource and we want to share our enjoyment with others. As we all know, we are always on the fish.



Last edited by kin on Mon Jan 07, 2019 2:38 pm; edited 1 time in total

7Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Mon Jan 07, 2019 1:37 pm

GT

GT
Senior FTFF Member
Senior FTFF Member
Ya what Kin said..........GT

8Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:29 pm

Jerdon

Jerdon
Moderator
Kin nailed it!!

1. For new people get the tube you saw or liked if you can afford it. I used a doughnut style tube and fished happily for many years.

2. Breathable waders with a front zipper are ideal. Finances can dictate other choices. For water 50 degrees or less neoprene is great. For water warmer than 55 degrees you will prefer breathable waders.

3. Force Fins, you can do a lot of testing and experimenting and come back to these. If finances are a problem then use what you can afford or already have.

4.  To start wear the PDF you already own. If you are buying one specifically for the float tube buy the one you think will float your head above water if you get knocked out.

5. You will figure out what works for you the more you use the tube and you will continually progress.

6. The biggest mistake I have made was fooling around with fins that were uncomfortable. It is easier to wear a shoe under a fin that is too large than it is to try and shove a wader foot into too small of fin, so buy them big.

7. You can do a search on any one of these topics and get answers for days. We all have personal preferences that change over time, so get out there and fish with what you have. I guarantee you will change your mind about some things the more you fish.


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9Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:46 pm

jeffcpr

jeffcpr
Admin
This is great info guys keep it coming.


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10Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:25 pm

SP Dan

SP Dan
Moderator
1. Don't forget your fishing rods! It happens! lol
2. Try to always fish with an experienced float tuber until you have gained your own level of confidence.
3. Try to attend "Open Invites" when possible or when offered.

I believe that Kin and Jerdon have pretty much covered all the bases! Thumbs Up


SP Dan <"))><


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11Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:27 pm

jeffcpr

jeffcpr
Admin
So far there has been some great information added here thanks guys here is some of my idea's

1. What type of tube do you need?
For a newbie looking to get into the sport, I suggest a V-Shape boat they are most available and seem to be the most versatile for fishing. Cost can be a factor and the amount of time you expect to spend on the water is a factor as well. But you cannot go wrong with a basic V-Shape float tube to start out with.

2. Waders what should I get and why?
Between neoprene and breathable I enjoy the breathable but that is also because I am in SoCal and water and weather are very suitable for these types of waders. So will say you don't need waders, but I still think it is good practice to wear them this is just my idea to each his own.

3. Fins which are best?
I have used dive fins for the last 20 years and I think they work best. There is a lot of info out there that call Hotspots better or force fins faster. I think that really when you find a pair of fins that fit and you like stick with them your muscle memory will kick in and they will work as good or better than the high-end fins. Again just my 2 cents.

4. PFD what should I be looking for and do I really need it?
I am now using an auto inflatable PFD I like the low profile of these PFD's they are less in the way when you are fishing. The idea that you have a life vest that will inflate when you hit the water is a good idea as there have been some instances that could have turned bad if people did not have an auto inflatable PFD. PFD are also required for most bodies of water by the Coast Gaurd or Life Gaurds on duty. Be sure that the vest you are using will support your weight when in the water and keep your head above the water. This is a must we promote Safety first and always.

5. Additional items I should be thinking about.
Wislte, water, snacks, sunscreen, hat, and anything else you need to protect yourself from the sun.

6. What mistakes I have made in the past?
Not packing up the night before an trying to remember everything in the morning, something always gets left behind.

7. Any extra advice to help the newbie.
Always as for help never go out alone and don't be afraid to ask for more help when needed. That is what the FTFF was made for and we want to help you be safe and enjoy you time out on the water.


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12Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:13 am

GT

GT
Senior FTFF Member
Senior FTFF Member
OK so we have most of the does and don'ts on equipment etc., but you also need to store items properly, fins, waders, booties and of coarse your tube.
First off, rinse everything off when you get home and air dry before storing. A mild soap once in a while doesn't hurt either.
If you can hang your waders.
One of the biggest decisions you make will be storing your tube. It is advisable to partially inflate your tube, about 60%-70%, out of the sun. Most guys hang their tubes from walls or in my case the rafters of my garage.........GT

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13Details for the new tuber Empty Re: Details for the new tuber on Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:20 am

jeffcpr

jeffcpr
Admin
Thats is great info you are right there is a lot to learn about for the newbie thanks for sharing.


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